really like the slip of light that resembles a triangle that made it’s way into the corner. 

really like the slip of light that resembles a triangle that made it’s way into the corner. 

http://www.matthewbrandt.com/works/lakes-and-reservoirs/

http://www.matthewbrandt.com/works/taste-tests/

http://www.matthewbrandt.com/works/taste-tests/

Christopher Bucklow

Christopher Bucklow

"Ideologies and beliefs are enabling structures, and it is possible, I suppose, to look upon the landscape paintings of the period as residual artifacts, made possible by group illusions, returning in the circularity of such reasoning, to their sources to offer and gather energy. The issue is what gives such illusions their durability and power; what leads to their formation and ultimate discharge; and what forces maintain them."

  - Barbara Novak, Nature and Culture

still from The Sky Taped Together, 2009Michael Sirianni 
http://www.michaelsirianni.com/the_sky_taped_together.html

still from The Sky Taped Together, 2009
Michael Sirianni 

http://www.michaelsirianni.com/the_sky_taped_together.html

 Noa Emberson

 Noa Emberson

Aspen Mays, Sun Ruins.

Really like that these images have absence in them. That the image itself is cut out and missing, and that negative space is what makes the image. 

(Source: aspenmays.com)

spacettf:

Enceladus by Adrian Jannetta on Flickr.

spacettf:

Enceladus by Adrian Jannetta on Flickr.

(via moschops911)

contemporaryartdaily:

Florian Maier-Aichen at Blum and Poe

contemporaryartdaily:

Florian Maier-Aichen at Blum and Poe

flasd:

“This image is actually a long exposure of Astronaut Gus Grissom sitting within the fearsome ‘MASTIF’ (an acronym for Multiple Axis Space Test Inertia Facility). The g-force throttling, spinning MASTIF is designed to help teach an astronaut how bring a tumbling capsule under control.”
- From Time-Life’s 1969 multimedia To the Moon, via sci-fi-o-rama.

flasd:

“This image is actually a long exposure of Astronaut Gus Grissom sitting within the fearsome ‘MASTIF’ (an acronym for Multiple Axis Space Test Inertia Facility). The g-force throttling, spinning MASTIF is designed to help teach an astronaut how bring a tumbling capsule under control.”

- From Time-Life’s 1969 multimedia To the Moon, via sci-fi-o-rama.

(Source: , via moschops911)

Caspar David Friedrich, Fir Trees in the Snow, 1828

Caspar David Friedrich, Fir Trees in the Snow, 1828

Katie Paterson, History of Darkness.
I like the idea behind this work, more than the display itself. 
Concept:
History of Darkness is a slide archive; a life-long project, it will eventually contain hundreds upon thousands of images of darkness from different times/places in the history of the Universe, spanning billions of years. Each image handwritten with its distance from earth in light years, and arranged from one to infinity.

Katie Paterson, History of Darkness.

I like the idea behind this work, more than the display itself. 

Concept:

History of Darkness is a slide archive; a life-long project, it will eventually contain hundreds upon thousands of images of darkness from different times/places in the history of the Universe, spanning billions of years. Each image handwritten with its distance from earth in light years, and arranged from one to infinity.

Rebecca Solnit - The Blue Of Distance

"The world is blue at its edges and in its depths. This blue is the light that got lost. Light at the blue end of the spectrum does not travel the whole distance from the sun to us. It disperses among the molecules of the air, it scatters in water. Water is colorless, shallow water appears to be the color of whatever lies underneath it, but deep water is full of this scattered light, the purer the water the deeper the blue. The sky is blue for the same reason, but the blue at the horizon, the blue of land that seems to be dissolving into the sky, is a deeper, dreamier, melancholy blue, the blue at the farthest reaches of the places where you see for miles, the blue of distance. This light that does not touch us, does not travel the whole distance, the light that gets lost, gives us the beauty of the world, so much of which is in the color blue. 

For many years, I have been moved by the blue at the far edge of what can be seen, that color of horizons, of remote mountain ranges, of anything far away. The color of that distance is the color of an emotion, the color of solitude and of desire, the color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go. For the blue is not in the place those miles away at the horizon, but in the atmospheric distance between you and the mountains. “Longing,” says the poet Robert Hass, “because desire is full of endless distances.” Blue is the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world. One soft humid early spring morning driving a winding road across Mount Tamalpais, the 2,500-foot mountain just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, a bend reveals a sudden vision of San Francisco in shades of blue, a city in a dream, and I am filled with a tremendous yearning to live in that place of blue hills and blue buildings, though I do live there, I just left there after breakfast, and the brown coffee and yellow eggs and green traffic lights filled me with no such desire, and besides I was there already and was looking forward to going hiking on the mountain’s west slope….”

(Source: libraryofwater.is)